Today in Ostentatious Kitchen Appliances: an $18,000 Coffee Maker

In the beginning, there was the 23-karat-gold ice cream sundae. It debuted in 2008 at a tony New York City restaurant.

Imagine, the finest Tahitian vanilla ice cream drizzled with the world’s most expensive chocolates, topped with caviar, almonds wrapped in gold leaf, and bits of candied fruits from Paris that cost $1,000 per pound.

The price tag: A cool $1,000, which made it the Guinness Book of World Records’ most expensive dessert.

Me? I might rather buy a plane ticket to somewhere warm.

Now, this just in from Royal Paris – the Royal Coffee Maker, possibly the world’s most expensive coffee maker, a bespoke addition to the common kitchen, is now in painstaking production.

Imagine a siphon-brew system with a Baccarat crystal carafe cradled in 24-karat gold (or silver, for the less well-heeled). Parts like the gargoyle spigot, fish key, counter weight, oak leaves and finials are made by a craftsman using the lost wax method. It sits upon a semi-precious black obsidian, azurite or malachite base, with or without your engraved initials or company name. Or family crest.

Check it out at www.royalcoffeemaker.com.

The cost: $10,000 to $18,000.

Just thought you should know.

The Best Movies of 2016

It wasn’t a good year for movies. It was a great year. Here are a few of the best.

“Jackie” – Natalie Portman deserves a best actress nomination if not an outright victory at the Oscars for her harrowing portrayal of Jacqueline Kennedy during the week in November 1963 when President John F. Kennedy was shot and killed during his fateful motorcade through Dallas. But that’s only half of this unusual bio-pic by Chilean director Pablo Larraín, who offers a multifaceted look at a woman who believed, perhaps rightly, that history is manufactured. Leaving the White House, Jackie takes us on a tour of national horror.

“American Honey” – A teen romance awash in reality, not nostalgia, a soundtrack that defies its budget, tremendous performances by leads Sasha Lane and Shia LaBeouf, and a remarkably trenchant investigation of American lower-class youth by Andrea Arnold, a foreign director. This is a long movie, but it’s filled with so much you don’t really care.

“Manchester by the Sea” – Director Kenneth Lonergan is interested in small, sometimes absurd moments of American tragedy. These are moments – a cellphone vibrating incessantly at a funeral, a duo unable to find a car while arguing over a will – that manage to invade the most solemn aspects of life. This sprawling, nonlinear account of an uncle (Casey Affleck) obliged to return to Boston to care for his recently deceased brothers’ child (Lucas Hedges) is essentially about a man who is utterly, heartbreakingly unsalvageable. It’s also one of the year’s funniest movies. That’s a Lonergan film.

“Moonlight” – This moving story finds an atypical victim in the black America of the ghetto: Chiron, played brilliantly by Alex R. Hibbert, Ashton Sanders and Trevante Rhodes in three stages of Chiron’s tortured youth and young adulthood while struggling to come to terms with his sexuality. Writer and director Barry Jenkins elevates the material by looking beyond the surfaces of prejudice and street life to find their intertwining complexities. Three compelling performances meld into one unified story of lost youth.

“The Light Between Oceans” – Like a melodrama escaped from Hollywood’s studio era, this story of doomed love from Derek Cianfrance (“Blue Valentine” and “The Place Beyond the Pines”) places a damaged World War I vet (Michael Fassbender) literally on an island, where he finds some solace and happiness only to have it washed away again. If you catch it in a theater likely you’ll hear other audience members openly weeping throughout.

“Love & Friendship” – Whit Stillman’s latest probably received the least fanfare of any Jane Austen adaption, which is a shame, because it’s one of the most unusual and enjoyable. Stillman brings his signature sense of humor to bear on the 18th-century wit of Austen, creating one of those love-as-musical-chairs stories where villains and victims abound but all’s well that ends well.

“Weiner-Dog” – All does not end well in a Todd Solondz film, and “Weiner-Dog,” about a peripatetic pup, is no exception. The insanity of the wrongdoing is just part of the fun in this amazing satire.

“The Neon Demon” – Is it being so obvious to be provocative, to make a bigger point, or simply so people get it? That’s difficult to say, but the latest heavily stylized thriller from Nicolas Winding Refn (“Drive”) is never boring in making its points about the fashion world. In his version, it revolves around a beautiful young newcomer (Elle Fanning) who gains the jealousy and ire of her rivals. Bathed in the glow of the gaseous light source of the title, the film is all the more amazing when you consider that Refn is color blind.

“A Bigger Splash” – Ralph Fiennes tears up the screen in Luca Guadagnino’s exotically set, slow-burning thriller about a rock musician (Tilda Swinton) who has lost her voice, and her ex-husband (Fiennes), who may have lost his mind. Dakota Johnson convincingly plays an obnoxious, scantily clad flibbertigibbet who serves as a potential red herring. Languidly paced but always heading down unexpected roads.

“Author: the JT LeRoy Story” – A strange enough tale to fill at least one documentary, the rise of reclusive author J.T. LeRoy (aka Laura Albert) is recounted in delicious detail, all from the perspective of Albert, who still may be trying to figure out exactly what happened.

Honorable Mentions: “Green Room,” one of the year’s best action thrillers, was sadly one of the last roles for star Anton Yelchin. Tom Ford’s style and Jake Gyllenhaal’s screen presence bring out the best in “Nocturnal Animals.” And “Elle” revels in fascinating people and their grotesque circumstances. S

Five Questions For The New President of the Virginia Historical Society

After a six-month national search, the board of trustees of the non-profit Virginia Historical Society announced the appointment of Jamie O. Bosket as its next president and CEO. He starts his new role on Feb. 27, 2017.

Currently, Bosket remains vice president for Guest Experience at George Washington’s Mount Vernon, one of the most visited historic sites of its kind in the country. He holds an M.A. in Museum Studies from George Washington University and an undergraduate degree in history from the State University of New York at Geneseo.

Bosket also serves on the board of the Virginia Association of Museums, representing Northern Virginia, and on the board of the Alexandria Historical Society.

While it’s early in the game, Style caught up with him for five introductory questions regarding the new role.

What was your biggest takeaway from your former job?

History matters…and your audience matters. Staying true to history and authenticity doesn’t have to be at odds with fun and dynamic programming. Meeting expectations for a modern and evolving audience doesn’t devalue historical collections. Successful museums must build on their strength, evolve with their community, and be ever-responsive to their constituents.

What most interests you about the history of the Commonwealth?

The history of the Commonwealth is at the very heart of the American experience. You can rarely find a pivotal moment or character in the history of this nation that doesn’t have a root in this wonderful state. Its influence and ideas have shaped our present, and will inform our future.

How did you sell yourself to the VHS?

My love of history and museums is a primary part of who I am. My personal goal – in previous museum roles as with this new chapter – is to blend my passion for preserving and sharing history with creativity and innovation in order to serve the public and enrich their lives through a better understanding of the past. The VHS is one of the nation’s preeminent history institutions, and is exceptionally strong. I am hopeful to build on their past success with fresh ideas, a strong focus on guest engagement and programming, and a renewed focus on expanding our reach across the state. I was very fortunate to lead an exceptional team at Mount Vernon that helped foster learning, drive attendance, and strengthen financial support.

What do you see as VHS’s strengths and weaknesses?

The VHS has one of the best historical narratives to tell … it has rich collections and scholarship, a remarkable board, talented staff, a fantastic and historic facility, a vibrant community, and a long and storied institutional track record. Its primary challenge will be finding a meaningful and lasting way to reach all areas of the Commonwealth as its presence outside of the greater Richmond area isn’t as strong as it deserves to be. It will also take effort to keep adapting, as all museums must, as generations and expectations change.

Anything you can say about future plans for “innovative revenue-generating programs”?

Stay tuned, this will be a major focus of future strategic planning, and the collective effort of VHS’s talented staff. Just like Mount Vernon, the VHS doesn’t rely on government funding, it depends on its generous supporters and members, as well as on its own ingenuity and entrepreneurship. As all museums must, including those well-positioned like the VHS, we will need to be thoughtful about ways to bring in more and new people going forward, and tell stories that resonate and have impact. We also must foster programming that allows learning and leisure to work in harmony, and activities that inspire and engage younger generations.

The VHS is located at 428 North Boulevard in Richmond’s Museum District. Hours are Monday – Sunday 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. for the galleries and museum shop, Monday – Saturday 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. for the library. For more information about the VHS call (804) 358-4901, visit vahistorical.org, or connect with the VHS on Facebook and Twitter.

“Dreamgirls” Bursts Through Tonight’s Artsies Awards

A complete list of winners at the Richmond theater community’s annual awards celebration.

With 13 nominations and seven wins, the stage-to-film-to-stage “Dreamgirls” dominated Richmond’s version of the Tony Awards tonight. Virginia Reportory Theatre’s splashy summer show won Best Musical and Best Direction of a Musical along with accolades for technical achievement.

Fitting that Desiree Roots, who played Effie, served as host of the Artsies awards show, held earlier tonight at Virginia Rep’s November Theatre.

Awards were chosen by a group of local reviewers who are members of the Richmond Theatre Critics Circle, in conjunction with the Richmond Theatre Alliance.

It was clear early on that the crowd-pleasing “Dreamgirls” was going to be a big source of entertainment.

“The music soars, the performances are spot-on, and the dazzling technical elements create beautiful stage pictures that will stick in your memory long after you leave the theater,” Style theater critic Dave Timberline wrote of the production.

Timberline also called out D. Jerome Wells — who won for Best Supporting Actor in a Musical — as the cast’s “most delightful surprise.”

TheatreLab’s “Venus in Fur,” co-produced with Yes, And Entertainment, won Best Play, with Maggie Roop’s performance in the show winning her a Best Actress award. The show was the directoral debut of Richmond actor Matt Shofner.

Style theater critic Rich Griset called “The Boy From Oz” a “rollicking good time,” and it netted two Artsies for Richmond Triangle Players — Best Actor in a Musical to Chris Hester, who spent a year preparing for the role of Peter Allen, and Best Supporting Actress in a Musical to Grey Garrett. It was her second time inhabiting the character of Judy Garland for a Richmond production, an experience she shared with Style.

Laine Satterfield won Best Direction of a Play for Virginia Rep’s “The Mountaintop,” which also received “Outstanding Achievement in Sound Design” for Jesse Senechel’s work.

“Bad Jews,” produced by TheatreLab, won the Ernie McClintock Award for Best Ensemble Acting. In his review, Griset wrote that the play “hits all the right comedic beats and manages a surprisingly touching close.”

Kate Belleman won Best Choreography for “Green Day’s American Idiot” at the Firehouse Theatre, and Debra Clinton and Jason Marks’ “Croaker: The Frog Prince Musical” won Outstanding Original Work. Here’s how that show came together.

Dancer Frances Wessells and actress Marie Goodman Hunter, both Richmond educators, received the Liz Marks Memorial Award for Ongoing Contribution to Richmond Theatre.

The complete list of nominees and winners is:

Best Musical

Winner: “Dreamgirls,” produced by Virginia Repertory Theatre

Other nominees:

“The Boy From Oz,” produced by Richmond Triangle Players

“Croaker: The Frog Prince Musical,” produced by Virginia Repertory Theatre

“Green Day’s American Idiot,” produced by Firehouse Theatre

“Little Shop of Horrors,” produced by Swift Creek Mill Theatre

Best Direction / Musical

Winner: Chase Kniffen, “Dreamgirls,” produced by Virginia Repertory Theatre

Other nominees:

Debra Clinton, “Croaker: The Frog Prince Musical,” produced by Virginia Repertory Theatre

Adam Ferguson, “Green Day’s American Idiot,” produced by Firehouse Theatre

Deejay Gray, “Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar and Grill,” produced by TheatreLab

Tom Width, “Little Shop of Horrors,” produced by Swift Creek Mill Theatre

Best Actor / Musical

Winner: Chris Hester, “The Boy From Oz,” produced by Richmond Triangle Players

Other nominees:

Denver Crawford, “Green Day’s American Idiot,” produced by Firehouse Theatre

Ian Page, “Little Shop of Horrors,” produced by Swift Creek Mill Theatre

Alexander Sapp, “Croaker: The Frog Prince Musical,” produced by Virginia Repertory Theatre

Jerold Solomon, “Dreamgirls,” produced by Virginia Repertory Theatre

Best Actress / Musical

Winner: Katrinah Carol Lewis, “Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar and Grill,” produced by TheatreLab

Other nominees:

Audra Honaker, “Little Shop of Horrors,” produced by Swift Creek Mill Theatre

Jenna Kraynak, “Seven Brides for Seven Brothers,” produced by Nu Puppis

Robyn O’Neill, “Gypsy,” produced by Virginia Repertory Theatre

Desiree Roots, “Dreamgirls,” produced by Virginia Repertory Theatre

Best Supporting Actor / Musical

Winner: D. Jerome Wells, “Dreamgirls,” produced by Virginia Repertory Theatre

Other nominees:

Billy Dye, “Dreamgirls,” produced by Virginia Repertory Theatre

Adam Mincks, “Little Shop of Horrors,” produced by Swift Creek Mill Theatre

Mahlan Raoufi, “Seven Brides for Seven Brothers,” produced by Nu Puppis

Durron Tyre, “Dreamgirls,” produced by Virginia Repertory Theatre

Best Supporting Actress / Musical

Winner: Grey Garrett, “The Boy From Oz,” produced by Richmond Triangle Players

Other nominees:

Felicia Curry, “Dreamgirls,” produced by Virginia Repertory Theatre

Kathy Halenda, “Croaker: The Frog Prince Musical,” produced by Virginia Repertory Theatre

Anna Hogan, The Boy From Oz, produced by Richmond Triangle Players

Jeannie Rule, The Boy From Oz, produced by Richmond Triangle Players

Best Choreography

Winner: Kate Belleman, “Green Day’s American Idiot,” produced by Firehouse Theatre

Other nominees:

Justin Amellio, “The Boy from Oz,” produced by Richmond Triangle Players

Debra Clinton, “Croaker: The Frog Prince Musical,” produced by Virginia Repertory Theatre

Leslie Owens-Harrington, “Dreamgirls,” produced by Virginia Repertory Theatre

Scott Putman, “Equus,” produced by Cadence Theatre, in partnership with Virginia Rep

Best Musical Direction

Winner: John Winn, “Dreamgirls,” produced by Virginia Repertory Theatre

Other nominees:

Kim Fox, “The Boy From Oz,” produced by Richmond Triangle Players

Matt Koon, “Green Day’s American Idiot,” produced by Firehouse Theatre

Jose Simbulan, “Gypsy,” produced by Virginia Repertory Theatre

Travis West, “Little Shop of Horrors,” produced by Swift Creek Mill Theatre

Best Play

Winner: “Venus in Fur,” produced by TheatreLab

Other nominees:

“4000 Miles,” produced by Cadence Theatre, in partnership with Virginia Rep

“American Buffalo,” produced by Quill Theatre

“The Mountaintop,” produced by Virginia Repertory Theatre

“Peter and the Starcatcher,” produced by Virginia Repertory Theatre

“Stupid Fucking Bird,” produced by Quill Theatre

Best Direction / Play

Winner: Laine Satterfield, “The Mountaintop,” produced by Virginia Repertory Theatre

Other nominees:

Anna Johnson, “Equus,” produced by Cadence Theatre, in partnership with Virginia Rep

Jon Kretzu, “Stupid Fucking Bird,” produced by Quill Theatre

Daniel Moore, “American Buffalo,” produced by Quill Theatre

Nathaniel Shaw, “Peter and the Starcatcher,” produced by Virginia Repertory Theatre

Matt Shofner, “Venus in Fur,” produced by TheatreLab

Best Actor / Play

Winner: Matthew Radford Davies, “The Merchant of Venice,” produced by Quill Theatre

Other nominees:

Joe Inscoe, “King Lear,” produced by Quill Theatre

Alan Sader, “American Buffalo,” produced by Quill Theatre

Alexander Sapp, “Summer and Smoke,” produced by Virginia Repertory Theatre

Jerold Solomon, “The Mountaintop,” produced by Virginia Repertory Theatre

Scott Wichmann, “Peter and the Starcatcher,” produced by Virginia Repertory Theatre

Best Actress / Play

Winner: Maggie Roop, “Venus in Fur,” produced by TheatreLab

Other nominees:

Kimberly Jones Clark, “Christmas on the Rocks,” produced by Richmond Triangle Players

Kelsey Cordrey, “Bad Jews,” produced by TheatreLab

Katrinah Carol Lewis, “The Mountaintop,” produced by Virginia Repertory Theatre

Irene Ziegler, “4000 Miles,” produced by Cadence Theatre, in partnership with Virginia Rep

Best Supporting Actor / Play

Winner: Alan Sader, “The Lazarus Syndrome,” produced by Richmond Triangle Players

Other nominees:

Jeff Clevenger, “Stupid Fucking Bird,” produced by Quill Theatre

Larry Cook, “Equus,” produced by Cadence Theatre, in partnership with Virginia Rep

Trevor Craft, “Brighton Beach Memoirs,” produced by Virginia Repertory Theatre

Robert Throckmorton, “Peter and the Starcatcher,” produced by Virginia Repertory Theatre

Best Supporting Actress / Play

Winner: Jessi Johnson, “Mr. Burns: A Post-Electric Play,” produced by TheatreLab

Other nominees:

Megan Graves, “Peter and the Starcatcher,” produced by Virginia Repertory Theatre

Audra Honaker, “Stupid Fucking Bird,” produced by Quill Theatre

Margarette Joyner, “for colored girls who have considered suicide / when the rainbow is enuf,” produced by Heritage Ensemble Theatre

Catherine Carol Walker, “Bad Jews,” produced by TheatreLab

Ernie McClintock Award for Best Ensemble Acting

Winner: “Bad Jews,” produced by TheatreLab

Other nominees:

“American Buffalo,” produced by Quill Theatre

“Brighton Beach Memoirs,” produced by Virginia Repertory Theatre

“Green Day’s American Idiot,” produced by Firehouse Theatre

“Mr. Burns: A Post-Electric Play,” produced by TheatreLab

“Stupid Fucking Bird,” produced by Quill Theatre

Most Promising Newcomer

Winner: Tyler Stevens, “Brighton Beach Memoirs,” produced by Virginia Repertory Theatre

Other nominees:

Emma Grace Bailey, “Creating Claire,” produced by HATTheatre

Adam Valentine, “Maple and Vine,” produced by Firehouse Theatre

Killian Winn, “King Lear,” produced by Quill Theatre

Ben Wilson, “Green Day’s American Idiot,” produced by Firehouse Theatre

Outstanding Original Work

Winner: “Croaker: The Frog Prince Musical,” created by Debra Clinton and Jason Marks, produced by Virginia Repertory Theatre

Other nominees:

“The Little Lion,” written by Irene Zeigler and produced by Swift Creek Mill Theatre

“Sweet Chocolate and the Seven Christians,” written by Margarette Joyner, produced by Heritage Ensemble Theatre

“Sadie’s Last Painting,” written by Alex Mayberry, produced by Free Jambalaya

Outstanding Achievement in Costume Design

Winner: Sarah Grady, “Dreamgirls,” produced by Virginia Repertory Theatre

Other nominees:

Sue Griffin, “Gypsy,” produced by Virginia Repertory Theatre

Jeanne Nugent, “Croaker: The Frog Prince Musical,” produced by Virginia Repertory Theatre

Jeanne Nugent, “Peter and the Starcatcher,” produced by Virginia Repertory Theatre

Mark Souza, The Boy from Oz, produced by Richmond Triangle Players

Outstanding Achievement in Lighting Design

Winner: Joe Doran, “Dreamgirls,” produced by Virginia Repertory Theatre

Other nominees:

Joe Doran, “The Little Lion,” produced by Swift Creek Mill Theatre

Joe Doran, “Little Shop of Horrors,” produced by Swift Creek Mill Theatre

Michael Jarrett, “The Boy from Oz,” produced by Richmond Triangle Players

BJ Wilkinson, “Summer and Smoke,” produced by Virginia Repertory Theatre

Outstanding Achievement in Set Design

Winner: Ron Keller, “Dreamgirls,” produced by Virginia Repertory Theatre

Other nominees:

Tennessee Dixon, “Stupid Fucking Bird,” produced by Quill Theatre

Vinnie Gonzalez, “American Buffalo,” produced by Quill Theatre

Rich Mason, “Summer and Smoke,” produced by Virginia Repertory Theatre

Craig Napoliello, “Peter and the Starcatcher,” produced by Virginia Repertory Theatre

Outstanding Achievement in Sound Design

Winner: Jesse Senechel, “The Mountaintop,” produced by Virginia Repertory Theatre

Other nominees:

Tadd Burrell, “Green Day’s American Idiot,” produced by Firehouse Theatre

Kelsey Cordrey, “American Buffalo,” produced by Quill Theatre

Derek Dumais, “Dreamgirls,” produced by Virginia Repertory Theatre

Joey Luck, “The Boy from Oz,” produced by Richmond Triangle Players

Liz Marks Memorial Award for Ongoing Contribution to Richmond Theatre

Marie Goodman Hunter, Frances Wessells

The 2016 Richmond Power List: Politics

Richmond’s biggest political power shift in eight years is underway, with that many candidates running to replace two-term Mayor Dwight Jones.

And in politics, as with most worlds, money is power. Or is it? After all, this is a topsy-turvy, unconventional election year, when the Republicans’ outsider nominee for president, a political newbie, faces a Democrat with a decades-strong war chest. Money may be a source and a result of political power, but it’s only part of the story.

Take the city’s mayoral race, where the top campaign earner, Levar Stoney, has raised $416,699 – nearly as much as his seven opponents combined, according to the most recent financial reports at the Virginia Public Access Project.

The candidate raising the second-highest amount is Jack Berry, at a far distant $210,804. Joe Morrissey is third, with $75,581 – not even 20 percent of Stoney’s haul.

Don’t go extrapolating popularity so fast. In their own ways, Berry, Morrissey and Stoney, along with most of the candidates, are outsiders in an outsider year.

Stoney comes as a fresh, youthful face to City Hall and city politics, but greatly owes his positioning to Gov. Terry McAuliffe. Stoney’s been firmly entrenched in a political career from a young age, most recently as secretary of the commonwealth.

Take a look at the 35-year-old’s upper-tier donors – the people who have given $2,500 or more, as reported by the access project. They’re responsible for $205,650, or nearly half, of the amount Stoney’s raised. Of them, 78 percent are donating from beyond the Richmond area. The top check, $10,540, is from Common Good VA, a Democratic fundraising committee set up by McAuliffe.

Contrast that with Berry, who’s spent the last 18 years at Venture Richmond, helping produce the Richmond Folk Festival, Friday Cheers and the 2nd Street Festival, among other projects. If you rattle off his top 10 donors you’ll find Richmond names with community ties. Ukrop, Gottwald, Bates. Keep reading and you could draw up an invitation list for a quite lovely soiree at the Country Club of Virginia. Watch his recent promotional video filled with flyover shots of the city and you’ll see familiar faces.

“He’s been kind of the big surprise, I think,” political analyst Bob Holsworth says. In the past, such business-oriented candidates as Berry have been duds politically.

But Berry seems to have communicated that this is something he wants, projecting energy, going after young professionals, campaigning hard. It “looks like a real campaign going on,” Holsworth says – not someone drafted by the business elite.

Indeed, while selling himself as someone who can get things fixed and help City Hall function again, Berry offered a poignant pitch at the first mayoral forum in April, speaking of his late son as inspiration, and his desire to make change.

How do you win election as mayor? If having eight candidates doesn’t make things complex enough, there’s the city charter. The easiest way to victory is to pull in the most votes in five of the city’s nine districts. Done.

If that doesn’t happen – a likely scenario given the number of people running – then the top two vote-getters citywide are put in a runoff. From there, the candidate still must win five of nine districts.

Some candidates have a better chance at winning in a runoff against one other person, while others may stand better odds if they win five districts outright. Which brings us to Morrissey. You’re either a fan or he makes you shudder, but he’s the biggest wild card in the race – and that gives him a leg up.

“Joe Morrissey is going to get a number of votes,” Holsworth says. “And I think he’s one of the few people who could win the five districts.”

The lawyer was re-elected to the House of Delegates in January 2015, but left to pursue a brief run for state Senate last year. He dropped out, citing a health episode, moved to the North Side, got married and entered the mayoral race in March.

“He has everybody running scared,” says a politico who’s closely involved in the campaigns. “He’s powerful in the realm of he is causing abject panic in the normal power structure in Richmond.”

Beyond the mayoral race, there are other shifts in the power structure underway. Richmond has seen the effects of organized, effective protests, demonstrations, rallies and movements – for equal rights, on environmental issues such as Dominion’s coal ash plans, on relations between police and their communities, and on social justice issues such as the recent Fight for $15 minimum-wage movement.

Beyond the mayoral race, City Council and School Board offices all are up for grabs – 18 seats in which at least 44 percent of the positions will be filled by someone other than an incumbent.

Richmond holds a cadre of behind-the-scenes players fueling political power – lobbying firms, developers, corporate interests and such giants as McGuireWoods and its army of lawyers and consultants.

And in this moment, in this rare convergence of turnover, unrest, struggles over resources and a most unusual election season, everyone is focused on moving one thing: you to the polls in November.

1. Tim Kaine

U.S. senator, vice-presidential candidate

He may not have amassed the personal wealth of some peers, as underscored by his recently disclosed tax releases. But Kaine is at his zenith of power as Hillary Clinton’s running mate in a battleground state. The former civil rights lawyer, who maintains his residence in the North Side, has political roots starting at City Hall, running through the Executive Mansion and stretching to Congress. Is he progressive enough? Can he straddle a defense of Clinton controversies while attacking Donald Trump controversies? This is his proving ground, and it’s Kaine’s time to leverage his power, demonstrate his mettle and perhaps become the Commonwealth’s first vice president since John Tyler.

2. Terry McAuliffe

Governor of Virginia

Voters registered “modest” job-approval ratings for McAuliffe a year ago, at 50 to 31 percent, according to a Quinnipiac University Swing State Poll. In May, a Morning Consult survey had his popularity at 58 percent. McAuliffe’s helping protégé Levar Stoney in the mayoral race, and made a popular, sweeping restoration of felons’ voting rights. The Virginia Supreme Court said he went too far, but he’s working around it. McAuliffe pushed such deals as Stone Brewing Co.’s arrival, Hardywood Park Craft Brewery’s expansion (hey, the guy likes beer) and Shandong Tranlin Paper Co.’s $2 billion plant in Chesterfield County, which broke ground in October. It will create 2,000 jobs by 2020, he said – long after his term ends in January 2008. Or will he be gone sooner, working with best buds the Clintons? “I don’t think I’d be good in a cabinet,” he said on 103.7 Play earlier this year. “I’ve never worked for anyone in my life.”

3. Donald McEachin

State senator, U.S. congressional candidate

The former delegate and now No. 2 Democrat in the state Senate is running for Congress. A Richmond lawyer, McEachin may not live within its boundaries, but his candidacy for the 4th District became official in June when he won the Democratic primary. With that status solidified, it appears that he’s beaten back any concern raised about his name and credit-card transactions showing up in a widely publicized hacking of the affair-seekers’ website, Ashley Madison. In answering a Times-Dispatch reporter, he denied his involvement and later told CBS-6: “At this time, this is a personal issue between my family and me. I will have no further statement on this issue.” This is a key race, an office previously held by Republican Randy Forbes, who left to run in the 2nd District, but lost the primary. And McEachin seems to be sitting pretty. “He’ll be a player for quite some time,” political analyst Bob Holsworth says.

4. Umesh Dalal

City auditor

Without his efforts, you wonder how much waste, fraud and questionable business practices would go undetected in city dealings. Dalal isn’t worried about popularity contests with people in power. He’s been there for a decade, digging through the muck and churning out reports that demand attention. His work dates to the city’s first popularly elected mayor, Doug Wilder, through two terms of Mayor Dwight Jones. Dalal also hasn’t left out the schools, tardy reports to the state auditor of public accounts and the disastrous implementation of an $18 million computer system. In many ways he’s laid the groundwork for the mayoral candidates’ top platform: to get in there and fix City Hall.

5. Anne Holton

Former secretary of education

As the daughter of former Gov. Linwood Holton, she’s lived in the Executive Mansion twice, the second time with her husband of more than 30 years, U.S. Sen. Tim Kaine. Now they have their sights set on the nation’s capital. Last month Holton resigned as secretary of education to join the campaign trail, traveling the country with Kaine and working to get Hillary Clinton elected. Holton is a former juvenile and domestic relations court judge who zeroed in on the foster care system in Virginia. She’s been a force behind an initiative of Virginia’s community colleges, Great Expectations, which helps create a bridge for foster youth from high school to life after a postsecondary education.

6. Dwight Jones

Mayor of Richmond

What’s a lame-duck mayor doing on a list like this? Disappointments, controversies and sluggish progress have fueled the overriding fix-the-mess pitches of mayoral hopefuls, with former Gov. Doug Wilder’s opening candidate forum a raucous indictment of the Jones legacy. But if this is a snapshot of power, Jones still sits on the throne – for now – and is senior pastor of First Baptist Church of South Richmond. Jones also has a measure of control over life in his wake: He recently appointed a respected nonprofit leader, Reggie Gordon, to his anti-poverty initiative’s Office of Community Wealth Building. And a new mayor would have trouble ignoring the strides of Police Chief Alfred Durham, put in place by Jones. Violent crime was down in 2015, and in an era of tensions and riots, Richmond’s community demonstrations have maintained a mutually respectful balance. Other loose threads are being tied off: a Church Hill grocery store, movement on Boulevard redevelopment and Bon Secours’ stepping up its nursing college project at the Westhampton School property. It’s a legacy scramble.

7. Joe Morrissey

Lawyer, mayoral candidate

He may be seasoned in politics, but Morrissey plays the role of an outsider to the political establishment – and seems ready to shake up City Hall. Voters tired of the mess there may be willing to overlook potential drama for a shot at someone unafraid of confrontation. With his boxing-glove logo underscoring his Fighting Joe brand, Morrissey has delivered a surprise hook to the now eight-way mayoral race. For months, politicos wondered whether to expect the unexpected, and they got it in March, when he announced his candidacy complete with a “Rocky Balboa” theme. His campaign chest lags behind, but he has name recognition, fervent supporters, and the ability to cross diverse constituencies. Morrissey acknowledges he’s not perfect, but says at least voters already know his “trials and tribulations.” He may be the one candidate who could win without a runoff.

8. Jack Berry

Mayoral candidate

He’s playing the mayor-as-chief-executive angle. A former official at City Hall and county administrator in Hanover County, Berry is calling upon that experience – as well as his 18 years with Venture Richmond – as proof he can lead and manage large organizations. His opponents might say Richmond is bigger than Hanover, and the stakes are higher than a successful Folk Festival. He also was on the losing side of a push to get a baseball stadium into Shockoe Bottom. But Berry is bringing passion to his campaign, pulling together an active operation with the financial backing of committed locals and powerhouses in the business community. If he finishes second and is in a runoff with Morrissey, he could get back into City Hall.

9. Selena Cuffee-Glenn

Chief administrative officer

The former city manager of Suffolk, Cuffee-Glenn, arrived in Richmond last year with an unenviable job: finish and submit the city’s 2014 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report to the state – which was due almost six months before she arrived. Six months later, in October, she had it finished with Finance Director Leonora Reid. “It is hard to change what has happened in the past,” she said during a community meeting. “I believe in competencies in staff. I believe in efficiencies.” But where’s the 2015 report? Still overdue. And last week came puzzling news that the city’s 2015-’16 fiscal year, ending June 30, is projected to have a $4.5 million surplus, not a multimillion-dollar deficit. As the Richmond Free Press noted, Cuffee-Glenn and Reid had blamed City Council’s shift of resources to the schools for the deficit, but with a projected surplus, “the success also appears to undermine their argument.” Cuffee-Glenn isn’t tied to many years of the mess, but a new mayor might be moved to sweep her away for a completely fresh start.

10. Dana Bedden

Superintendent, Richmond Public Schools

With City Hall’s elected officials facing the polls in November, it’s good news and tricky news for Bedden. An upended School Board will be scrambling, and former chairman Jeff Bourne, even if re-elected, could be pulled away to higher political aspirations. Bedden got a budget increase from City Council, but not the one he wanted. And in the mayoral race, schools have become a priority plank, getting the attention they deserve. But it also means whoever’s elected will be under intense pressure to make something happen. For Bedden, results must be imminent – and he must show that he’s a key player in them. Can he face what’s headed his way? He had a popular start in 2014, and last year, after news broke that he was interviewing for a post in Boston, he was persuaded to withdraw his application. But one of his saving graces, Anne Holton, no longer is secretary of education. There’s no more time for a honeymoon.